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Optimism and Pessimism - Disease impact

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    Optimism and Pessimism - Disease impact

    Some other threads are making g me think about optimism and pessimism.

    Both have a lot to do with the choices we make in how we live our lives and the quality of life we have.

    In optimism, I am not talking about blind optimism with Rose colored glasses, but general outlook on the positive side.

    I have to do research and see if any studies related to attitudes and disease progression. I know a positive attitude can't rid us of MS and eliminate progression. But could it be worse without optimism?

    Any personal thoughts or antecdotes?
    Kathy
    DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

    #2
    Originally posted by pennstater View Post
    Any personal thoughts or antecdotes?
    I think that a positive mindset and the ability to deal with adversity with grace and courage definitely impacts the final result.
    Youre only as bad off as you feel you are.
    I don’t think that a positive mindset magically keeps us from relapsing or progressing, but it can keep us going day to day - and that will inevitably have an impact on us much further down the road.
    We may not be able to control the changes to our body, but we have to care for our minds because in the end, isn’t the body just a vessel for the soul?
    “I’m pretty and tough, like a diamond. Or beef jerky in a ball gown.” - Titus Andromedon

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      #3
      I realized how nutty crunchy my response was and figured that I should clarify that I don't believe that it's possible to always feel positive, but it is important to see things in context and not let negative thoughts and feelings totally consume you.
      Personally, I am a fatalist with a bit of optimism thrown in: I subscribe to the mindset that "everything happens for a reason", "it is what it is", "this is just how it's supposed to be". Then I look at the situation and try to see the positive side. And the humor, always.
      It can be really, really hard to see the bright side of a bad situation but I'll always look for it because I'm not about to willingly go down a rabbit hole of despair. I choose not to become comfortable in my own misery.
      “I’m pretty and tough, like a diamond. Or beef jerky in a ball gown.” - Titus Andromedon

      Comment


        #4
        I will try to keep my own feelings about this disease out of this thread… but to answer your question in my life I have always found being realistic about things is better for me. Being optimistic, only to end up disappointed hurts a lot more than hoping for the best and ending up having my heart ripped out.


        - Not talking about this disease with this one but just different life experiences in general…

        I always say to hope for the best but to prepare and expect the worst. It’s been my life motto and for everything else in my life it has helped.

        Example – my cat was given 6 months to live almost 4 years ago. She is sitting in my lap as I type this. I did not want her to die and I did everything and I mean everything to give her a fighting chance for those 6 months and here she is today, happy and spoiled and very loved. But I was fully prepared for what was probably going to happen having seen cases like hers and knowing the 0.000001% of cases don’t exist. ( or they only exist in textbooks )



        But I guess if I am going to get lucky about something in my life I will take that little ball of fluff living forever any day.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by IntoDust View Post
          Personally, I am a fatalist with a bit of optimism thrown in: I subscribe to the mindset that "everything happens for a reason", "it is what it is", "this is just how it's supposed to be". Then I look at the situation and try to see the positive side. And the humor, always.
          It can be really, really hard to see the bright side of a bad situation but I'll always look for it because I'm not about to willingly go down a rabbit hole of despair. I choose not to become comfortable in my own misery.
          I like this approach. I'm a bit more cynical but my sheer scrappiness and determination wouldn't allow me the luxury of wallowing in self pity. Regardless of being fairly pessimistic about my long term prognosis I'm continuing to make hay while the sun is shining. I have literally had the best years of my life since my diagnosis.
          He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.
          Anonymous

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Jules A View Post
            I like this approach. I'm a bit more cynical but my sheer scrappiness and determination wouldn't allow me the luxury of wallowing in self pity. Regardless of being fairly pessimistic about my long term prognosis I'm continuing to make hay while the sun is shining. I have literally had the best years of my life since my diagnosis.
            I'm having one of the worst years in many and I've only been diagnosed for 3 1/2 months
            But, I've been taking a lot of proactive steps even though some of them have been really hard and at times I feel like I'm at a standstill - or worse, going backwards.
            But I'm trying to accept that some things are beyond my control and this is my Achilles heel. I am a planner. I have to have a Plan A, Plan B, Plan C for every situation.
            It's ironic that I was diagnosed with one of the most unpredictable diseases one can have. But you know, this just means that this is a lesson I was definitely supposed to learn in this life. I can fight it and hate it, or I can resign myself and actually learn from it.
            “I’m pretty and tough, like a diamond. Or beef jerky in a ball gown.” - Titus Andromedon

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by IntoDust View Post
              I have to have a Plan A, Plan B, Plan C for every situation.
              It's ironic that I was diagnosed with one of the most unpredictable diseases one can have. But you know, this just means that this is a lesson I was definitely supposed to learn in this life.
              I'd be certain there is some sort of karmic joker regarding my love of control and this stupid unpredictable largely uncontrollable disease.

              3.5 months is early in the game. My first few months were awful and a total blur. Give yourself time to find your equilibrium and hopefully your best years are yet to come also.
              He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.
              Anonymous

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Jules A View Post
                3.5 months is early in the game. My first few months were awful and a total blur. Give yourself time to find your equilibrium and hopefully your best years are yet to come also.
                I actually still have my equilibrium! No dizziness for me yet
                The diagnosis may be new but I’ve known that I have MS for just over two years. And when I say I knew, I mean I knew. I really think that not going through a shocking diagnosis has made it easier to accept than for some people who were blind sided by this.
                “I’m pretty and tough, like a diamond. Or beef jerky in a ball gown.” - Titus Andromedon

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by IntoDust View Post
                  I really think that not going through a shocking diagnosis has made it easier to accept than for some people who were blind sided by this.

                  I think this is the most truthful and 100% correct thing I have ever read anywhere about this disease.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by IntoDust View Post
                    I really think that not going through a shocking diagnosis has made it easier to accept than for some people who were blind sided by this.
                    Mine was quick and shocking but easy to accept. I suddenly couldn't see, labs were negative and MRI showed "multiple" lesions on my brain. It didn't make sense not to accept it and try to move forward.
                    He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.
                    Anonymous

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by penstater
                      But could it be worse without optimism?
                      Yes, IMO It's called stress. Anxiety. Worry. All leading to "...a rabbit hole of despair." as stated by IntoDust.

                      You are the only one responsible for how you think, for how you act when questioned by life's accidents, diseases or violence. If there is a meaning to life at all it hinges on personal responsibility.

                      "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." --O. Wilde

                      The more we realize that responsibility applies to all words, all actions, everyone's life would improve.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by 502E79 View Post
                        You are the only one responsible for how you think, for how you act when questioned by life's accidents, diseases or violence. If there is a meaning to life at all it hinges on personal responsibility.

                        "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." --O. Wilde

                        The more we realize that responsibility applies to all words, all actions, everyone's life would improve.
                        I'm not sure I could expressed this as well as you have Jer. Thank you.
                        Diagnosed 1984
                        “Lightworkers aren’t here to avoid the darkness…they are here to transform the darkness through the illuminating power of love.” Muses from a mystic

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I’m going to try and remain hopeful and positive as best I can. Because I think I know where being negative will get me.
                          It was one agains't 2.5million toughest one we ever fought.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I generally take a positive attitude despite having progressive MS. For me, this is the only direction I can and will take. Period. It has saved me from crawling into an endless dark cave. But at one point in my life, it took courage, work and determination (and yes, meds and therapy) to come through the dark and into the light at the other end.

                            I found this article from the Mayo Clinic that reinforces the benefits of being positive.
                            Many health benefits include:

                            Increased life span
                            Lower rates of depression
                            Lower levels of distress
                            Greater resistance to the common cold
                            Better psychological and physical well-being
                            Better cardiovascular health and reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
                            Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

                            If you find you are a glass half empty kind of person, the article gives examples to turn negatives into positives.

                            https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-l...g/art-20043950
                            1st sx '89 Dx '99 w/RRMS - SP since 2010
                            Administrator Message Boards/Moderator

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Seasha View Post
                              I generally take a positive attitude despite having progressive MS. For me, this is the only direction I can and will take. Period. It has saved me from crawling into an endless dark cave. But at one point in my life, it took courage, work and determination (and yes, meds and therapy) to come through the dark and into the light at the other end.

                              I found this article from the Mayo Clinic that reinforces the benefits of being positive.
                              Many health benefits include:

                              Increased life span
                              Lower rates of depression
                              Lower levels of distress
                              Greater resistance to the common cold
                              Better psychological and physical well-being
                              Better cardiovascular health and reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
                              Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

                              If you find you are a glass half empty kind of person, the article gives examples to turn negatives into positives.

                              https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-l...g/art-20043950
                              Excellent article. Thank you Seasha. From the article:

                              Practice positive self-talk. Start by following one simple rule: Don't say anything to yourself that you wouldn't say to anyone else. Be gentle and encouraging with yourself. If a negative thought enters your mind, evaluate it rationally and respond with affirmations of what is good about you. Think about things you're thankful for in your life.

                              I learned about the benefits of self talk many years ago, while in therapy.

                              You've got to become your own very best friend, biggest supporter, and encourager.

                              Afterall, you're 'stuck' with yourself 24/7.

                              Take Care
                              PPMS for 24 years (dx 1998)
                              ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

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