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Here I am 15 years into MS

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    Here I am 15 years into MS

    I suffered at the beginning and it took dietary changes and supplements, but I am maintaining well. Tara Palmer was instrumental in my plan for better health. I absolutely do not eat: gluten, legumes, refined sugars, raw dairy. I eat well and take a variety of supplements, based on Tara's help. I work a full time job, exercise daily using a bowflex and indoor bike and recently started mountain biking outdoors.

    I attribute my mild disease course to early dietary changes. My PCP and neurologist both commented that my recovery was remarkable. I want to keep sharing my experience because I truly feel diet is crucial in surviving autoimmunity.
    Don't be afraid of the waves- Focus on the MASTER walking on the water - you won't even SEE the waves

    #2
    Good for you Twenty Miles!

    I have maintained a healthy lifestyle, eaten well (90% organic) and taken many recommended supplements and I still have experienced major decline after 30 years. I blame it on being in limbo for too many years. But, I wonder sometimes what I'd be like if I hadn't eaten well - worse than I am now?

    In fairness to many of us, eating well can enhance our sense of well-being, but still the damage from the beast can leave us more disabled.

    I so glad you have a mild course and are able to maintain your level of activity! Keep up the good work!
    1st sx '89 Dx '99 w/RRMS - SP since 2010
    Administrator Message Boards/Moderator

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      #3
      Originally posted by Seasha View Post
      Good for you Twenty Miles!

      I have maintained a healthy lifestyle, eaten well (90% organic) and taken many recommended supplements and I still have experienced major decline after 30 years. I blame it on being in limbo for too many years. But, I wonder sometimes what I'd be like if I hadn't eaten well - worse than I am now?

      In fairness to many of us, eating well can enhance our sense of well-being, but still the damage from the beast can leave us more disabled.

      I so glad you have a mild course and are able to maintain your level of activity! Keep up the good work!
      You have many years of experience.
      If you don't mind me asking, at what point/age did you see the decline? I was diagnosed at 38 with RRMS. The first 2 years were horrible, then I improved. I am wondering if things will get bad in my 50's. I have read stories of others that experienced problems after years of mild disease course at this age.
      Don't be afraid of the waves- Focus on the MASTER walking on the water - you won't even SEE the waves

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        #4
        Hi Twenty Mile-

        I was finally diagnosed at the age of 50, but I had my first really bad flare 10 years before (age40), with a few flare ups within those years . I was on Avonex and Copaxone for many years with what I call a mild course.

        But by the age of 60 (20 years from first flare), there was some noticeable decline with more decline each passing year (I was then told I had SPMS).

        So, 10 years with some flares and on drugs that have a low efficacy rate might have made a difference? Maybe not? Someone here on MSW has always mentioned that MS is mild until it's not.

        Regardless, I honestly feel that good nutrition, exercise, and a healthy lifestyle have made a difference. You should continue concentrating on your healthy lifestyle. Many people I know who have had MS as long as I have are still on a mild course!

        Take care
        1st sx '89 Dx '99 w/RRMS - SP since 2010
        Administrator Message Boards/Moderator

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Seasha View Post
          Hi Twenty Mile-

          I was finally diagnosed at the age of 50, but I had my first really bad flare 10 years before (age40), with a few flare ups within those years . I was on Avonex and Copaxone for many years with what I call a mild course.

          But by the age of 60 (20 years from first flare), there was some noticeable decline with more decline each passing year (I was then told I had SPMS).

          So, 10 years with some flares and on drugs that have a low efficacy rate might have made a difference? Maybe not? Someone here on MSW has always mentioned that MS is mild until it's not.

          Regardless, I honestly feel that good nutrition, exercise, and a healthy lifestyle have made a difference. You should continue concentrating on your healthy lifestyle. Many people I know who have had MS as long as I have are still on a mild course!

          Take care
          I am doing everything I possibly can and looking at the future (retirement, kids weddings etc.) and the concern always creeps in. Disease course is so individual. I feel I am conditioning my body for the upcoming battle. Life goes by so fast. I never dreamt I would be doing this well 15 years in. It almost seems too good to be true.
          Don't be afraid of the waves- Focus on the MASTER walking on the water - you won't even SEE the waves

          Comment


            #6
            I'm 17 years in and agree, we are what we eat. Although we can never tell what the future may bring to our door, we can give it hell while capable.
            The future depends on what you do today.- Gandhi

            Comment


              #7
              Congrats on doing so well. Diet is an important part of the fight, along with exercise and DMTs.

              It maybe that starting on an anti-inflammatory diet early in your disease course protected you from relapses and corresponding damage that could have led to subsequent progression.

              As you said, it can be so individual. When my mom passed at 84, the doctors thought she may have had a "mild" case of MS. They wanted to test her at 78, but she figured, why? She wasn't going to start DMTs. They think her healthy diet and commitment to exercise helped her out.

              I personally went 13 years between relapses, undiagnosed and untreated with really no problems. I didn't follow any particular diet and was an intermittent exerciser. I know I was lucky. But had I healthier lifestyle, maybe I would not have had the 2nd relapse at all!

              Now, if I don't exercise and eat unhealthy, I really feel it. Mostly, it affects my fatigue level, and when that increases, it brings other symptoms with it.

              Keep doing all you are! I wish you continued good luck and a stable prognosis.
              Kathy
              DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

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