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Melissa Simpson

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  • Mamabug
    replied
    Welcome to MSWorld, Janel. I also enjoyed your humor in telling your story. It looks like you might have a gift for writing. Feel free to contribute to our Creative Center.

    https://msworld.org/creative-center/

    I'm playing "catch-up" following a 2-3 week vacation. Sorry for my delayed response.

    Leave a comment:


  • SNOOPY
    replied
    Hello janelbanks and welcome to MSWorld

    I enjoyed how you told your story, very interesting read. I am sorry you have found relationships difficult The right person will stay regardless, the others are not worth having ~ In my opinion.

    I started having symptoms in childhood and/or early teens, I was diagnosed at 23. I met my husband when I was 18 and he saw me fall many times as well as some other off the wall things. We dated for almost 2 years and then married. Neither one of us had ever heard of MS but we learned together. We have been married 38 years.

    Looking forward to more of your posts.

    Take care

    Leave a comment:


  • KoKo
    replied
    Hello janelbanks

    Welcome and thank you for sharing your story!

    Looking forward to more of your posts.

    Hopefully Melissa Simpson is laying low and behaving.

    Take Care

    Leave a comment:


  • pennstater
    replied
    Welcome Janelbanks. I see this is your first post. If you get a chance, head over to the 'Tell us about yourself' forum and introduce yourself.

    I am sorry that MS, aka Melissa Simpson, has impacted your relationships. Lots of people have experienced this. And others, fortunate to meet or have married people willing to stick around, for better or worse.

    Likewise, some friends fall by the wayside, and others step up or into our lives.

    There are good people out there - don't give up on all.

    Leave a comment:


  • janelbanks
    started a topic Melissa Simpson

    Melissa Simpson

    Melissa Simpson

    Have you ever known someone that for some strange reason felt that you were good friends and always showed up at the most inopportune times? Well if you donít, consider yourself lucky because I do. Her name is Melissa Simpson and she has made her presence known for years now despite my many attempts to get her to scram.

    Now, I will admit that she and I have similar interests-especially in men. Recently, I went on a date with a nice man named Justin Shaw and I made the mistake of telling her about him. When he arrived I heard him walking up the stairs to my front door. I opened the door and greeted him with Melissa standing right behind me.

    Just as we began to walk down the stairs of my home, Melissa Simpson-with her usual horrible sense of humor-prevented me from walking. Luckily, Justin was a gentleman and he ignored her and helped me down the stairs. That may sound like a minor annoyance to you but that is only the tip of the iceberg.

    A few years ago I was seeing a great guy named Robert King. Knowing how Melissa was I decided to tell him about her on our first date. He seemed uneasy when I told him but shockingly, she kept her distance for a while. About a year or so into the relationship there came a time when I needed to be checked into the hospital. Robert spent the night with me and of course Melissa decided that she should be there too and camped out in the room with us.

    Clearly she likes to be the center of attention and refused to be ignored. When Robert would leave for work in the morning Melissa Simpson would stay and wait for the doctors to come in and examine me. One day my doctor asked me if I could wiggle my toes. Just as I began to do so, Melissa put her hand over my feet so he couldnít see them move.

    Then there was a time when a physician asked me to read some letters on a chart and Melissa put her hands over my eyes. Another way to show her dreadful sense of humor.

    Now Iím sure you are wondering where and when I met her. Well, I was a recent law school grad and I graciously accepted a position at a law firm in Atlanta, GA. I didnít have many friends there and it wasnít long before she made her acquaintance. I thought she was a bit irritating but tolerable.

    After a few months, I met a really kind and sweet gentleman named Henry Askew. We instantly clicked and quickly began to care a lot for one another. Thatís when Melissa swooped in and decided that she wanted to be in the center of our relationship. One day I wasnít feeling well and I asked her to get me a snack from my kitchen. She just stood over me smirking.

    Luckily, Henry would ignore her and he did it himself. Then there came a time when my balance wasnít so good and Henry would have to help me get dressed and oftentimes iron my clothes for me. Do you think the ever present house guest from hell offered any assistance?

    Well Iím sure by now you have figured out that Melissa Simpson is not just your average pain in the neck. Thatís because Melissa isnít a woman at all. She is not even a person. Her real name is Multiple Sclerosis. I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis May 5, 2005. At the time, I decided to avail myself of all the information that I could to avoid any surprises. You know, expect the worst and hope for the best. Well I did experience some of what I had read about.

    When I wrote that Melissa Simpson was covering my eyes, I was really referring to the time that I had gone blind. When I said that she was putting her hand over my feet, I was referring to a time when I couldnít even move my toes. I had read about those unfortunate occurrences as it related to my body-but one thing I never read about was how this disease could affect my interpersonal relationships.

    The men in this story are very real but the names that were selected for them include their initials only. All of the situations I described in this story are true events. My only hope now is that I can help others when Melissa Simpson decides to pay them a visit.

    ** Moderator's note - Post broken into paragraphs for easier reading. Many people with MS have visual difficulties that prevent them from reading large blocks of print. **
    Last edited by pennstater; 06-25-2019, 10:57 AM.
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