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    Thanks for letting me be a part

    I was diagnosed with Transverse Myelitis in 2004 and MS upon relapse in 2016. I have permanent pain and numbness in my right fingers, hand and lower arm from the 2004 event. 56 years old living in Southwestern Indiana USA. All the best to every one of us.

    #2
    Originally posted by jdrich23 View Post
    I was diagnosed with Transverse Myelitis in 2004 and MS upon relapse in 2016. I have permanent pain and numbness in my right fingers, hand and lower arm from the 2004 event. 56 years old living in Southwestern Indiana USA. All the best to every one of us.
    Hello jdrich23

    Welcome!

    If you have any questions, just ask and we'll be glad to help if we can.

    Glad you have joined us.

    Take Care
    PPMS for 23 years (dx 1998)
    ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

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      #3
      Welcome aboard, jdrich! We're glad you joined us and hope to see you often!
      1st sx '89 Dx '99 w/RRMS - SP since 2010
      Administrator Message Boards/Moderator

      Comment


        #4
        Welcome jdrich23! Glad you found us. Look forward to more posts from you.
        Kathy
        DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

        Comment


          #5
          Hi jdrich.

          Glad you found us.
          What is transverse myelitis if you don't mind me asking. Is it related to ms?

          Best wishes.
          Ei

          Comment


            #6
            Welcome Leenyl!

            Sorry to hear about your pain and your MS. I'm 57 years old, I live in Kansas, and I've had MS since 2002.
            ~ Faith
            MSWorld Volunteer -- Moderator since JUN2012
            (now a Mimibug)

            Symptoms began in JAN02
            - Dx with RRMS in OCT03, following 21 months of limbo, ruling out lots of other dx, and some "probable stroke" and "probable CNS" dx for awhile.
            - In 2008, I was back in limbo briefly, then re-dx w/ MS: JUL08
            .

            - Betaseron NOV03-AUG08; Copaxone20 SEPT08-APR15; Copaxone40 APR15-present
            - Began receiving SSDI / LTD NOV08. Not employed. I volunteer in my church and community.

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              #7
              Leenyi and all my other friends,

              Transverse Myelitis (TM) is a lesion on the spine, and many of us with TM subsequently develop MS, or I think it may be more correct to say it was always MS. Sort of like hurricanes can cause tornadoes, MS can cause TM.

              My TM has resulted in constant pain, and that's the primary issue I have. Thanks for asking, I'd be interested in how many know about TM, given it's close relationship to MS.

              John

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                #8
                Hi jdrich23.

                Just a FYI of what Transverse Myelitis is and the causes of TM:

                https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/...tis-fact-sheet

                Were you tested for Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO)?
                Diagnosed 1984
                “Lightworkers aren’t here to avoid the darkness…they are here to transform the darkness through the illuminating power of love.” Muses from a mystic

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by SNOOPY View Post
                  Just a FYI of what Transverse Myelitis is and the causes of TM

                  Hi Snoopy and to you too jdrich23,

                  So what I think I'm hearing.... TM (lesion on spine) can be, but not necessarily be, MS? But MS can be identified by a lesion on spine....?

                  I did read the link, at least until my eyes glazed over.

                  Originally posted by SNOOPY View Post
                  Were you tested for Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO)?

                  I will go back to the link... maybe the answer to my NMO question came after my eyes glazed over.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hi 502E79

                    I agree the article is a bit much to read and I can certainly understand vision issues trying to read all of it. The "itis" portion of Transverse Myelitis means inflammation of the spinal cord. This could be caused by many things including MS or NMO.

                    There are blood tests for NMO and NMO is treated differently than MS. NMO has spinal cord lesions that are elongated and cover a larger area of the spinal cord. MS spinal cord lesions are small spots much like we see on the brain MRIs.

                    My knowledge of NMO is limited, although I had testing for it quite some years ago. We have had members on MSWorld that have been diagnosed with MS when in fact it was NMO and those that were diagnosed from the start with NMO.

                    Grace53 is a long time member that has been very helpful through the years on the topic of NMO. I have not seen her on MSWorld for quite some time and hope she is still hanging in there with NMO.

                    Transverse Myelitis can be caused by many things, and not necessarily MS or NMO.

                    Sorry if this still causes a problem with your vision

                    Below is from the URL I posted.

                    Immune system disorders. These disorders appear to play an important role in causing damage to the spinal cord. Such disorders are:

                    aquaporin-4 autoantibody associated neuromyelitis optica.
                    Multiple Sclerosis.

                    post-infectious or post-vaccine autoimmune phenomenon, in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissue while responding to the infection or, less commonly, a vaccine

                    an abnormal immune response to an underlying cancer that damages the nervous system; or
                    other antibody-mediated conditions that are still being discovered.

                    Viral infections.

                    It is often difficult to know whether direct viral infection or a post-infectious response to the infection causes the transverse myelitis. Associated viruses include herpes viruses such as varicella zoster (the virus that causes chickenpox and shingles), herpes simplex, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr; flaviviruses such as West Nile and Zika; influenza, echovirus, hepatitis B, mumps, measles, and rubella.

                    Bacterial infections
                    such as syphilis, tuberculosis, actinomyces, pertussis, tetanus, diphtheria, and Lyme disease. Bacterial skin infections, middle-ear infections, campylobacter jejuni gastroenteritis, and mycoplasma bacterial pneumonia have also been associated with the condition.
                    Fungal infections in the spinal cord, including Aspergillus, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, and Cryptococcus.

                    Parasities, including Toxoplasmosis, Cysticercosis, Shistosomiasis, and Angtiostrongyloides.

                    Other inflammatory disorders that can affect the spinal cord, such as sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren’s syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease, scleroderma, and Bechet’s syndrome.

                    Vascular disorders such as arteriovenous malformation, dural arterial-venous fistula, intra spinal cavernous malformations, or disk embolism.
                    Diagnosed 1984
                    “Lightworkers aren’t here to avoid the darkness…they are here to transform the darkness through the illuminating power of love.” Muses from a mystic

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks to everyone, it's nice to have people interested. I was tested for NMO in 2004. I explain my TM and MS by labeling MS the hurricane and TM the tornado that was caused by the Hurricane MS.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by SNOOPY View Post

                        Transverse Myelitis can be caused by many things, and not necessarily MS or NMO.

                        Sorry if this still causes a problem with your vision
                        Hi Snoopy,

                        I gave you the wrong impression, I apologize. My questions about TM, my need to stop reading, "eyes glazing over," was not due to any MS related vision issues or to NMO, only to the abundance of possible causes.

                        I guess I look to get a better grasp of MS and all that can be affected by the illness. I try to relate it to my MS, my dx, my sx, etc. To an extent this works, we here at MSW, can help each other. But I'm sorry to say that it (the info) can get overwhelming. For me this has always happened quickly. More so lately.

                        I don't wish to be ignorant but do avoid the stress related to extensive research. That's just me ;-)

                        However, thanks for the insight in to TM and NMO. My initial "monophasic condition" (neuros words for small questionable spot on spine) was confirmed 6 months later by a second MRI.

                        Thanks again Snoopy!

                        Jer

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