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Pain isn't an MS symptom?

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    #16
    apologize

    I feel I need to either apologize or defend my statement.
    Ēnot feelĒ I meant just the pains. By feeling the pain keeps me on track to learn how to move about more carefully. I just like when the pain subsides to a dull ache, or something feels good enough to over-ride it.

    QUOTE=502E79;1519896]My experience has been that the pain I suffer is generally spasticity. Relentless at times. And to a minor extent the "out-of-nowhere" pain, the kind no opiate will ever reach.

    I found that slow daily stretching is superior to any message. Spasticity still present but held at bay or even made less spastic, without any other means. Only you really know your body and what needs to be worked, the best masseuse with a great tactile sense is secondary, expensive and can become a dependency.

    Also I am NEVER happy "not to feel"... my MS may be progressing but to lose contact, even if it is painful contact, is far worse. Mental location of my lower right leg in time and space is basically lost to me. But by using what I have, unadulterated, I manage.

    Apologies to the OP with regards to thoughts on opioids. I agree with Snoopy. Also, I think opioids separate us even further from our own bodies. My body may be riddled with MS, but only I can discipline my body.[/QUOTE]

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      #17
      This is interesting as I just did some research for a friend who has fibromyalgia and is on a very low dose of opioids for the pain. But he has been on it for quite an extended amount of time.

      Other things that he suffers from is EXTREME constipation, extreme disruption to sleep patterns, esophageal spasms, nausea, mental fog and lethargy and has severe pain that is hard to describe and not localized.

      It was quite a shock when I started researching and found that each one of those things is tied to extended opioid use. I knew about the constipation, but the rest was an eye opener...to think that all these things that he is going through could be caused by the one thing that he thought was supposed to be helping him with his pain!

      He is going to be looking into alternatives to the opioid that he is on and my fingers are crossed that these side effects will dissipate.

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        #18
        Originally posted by DonnaH View Post
        I am the type who hates taking pills. BUT when I canít stand it I do.
        I'm a caregiver and my latest client was addicted to pain pills. Thereís no doubt she had pain, but once I got her up moving and stretching she started to feel better. It took me a year to ween her off, she, at 75 she was a drug addict. Only because she had a quack who found it easier to write a script instead of helping her.

        That is why we now have to suffer, the endless aches and pains that never subside. Not to mention the endless ER Drs who wrote norco, codeine and even morphine (for me personally) for anything I explained to them. I did NOT want them but because of last 25+ years of the easy way out they(dr) bred more and more addicts and and it was an easy way for addicts to get their ďfixĒ. Go to the ER and say my back hurts, say I have a headache and out comes the script pad.

        Now that the time has come of reality admitting our MS pain is real we must suffer the mistakes of yesterdayís.
        I still hate pills and do everything I can to avoid them. We invested in a spa, I pay for deep massages, I have just flat suffered and tried what I can to avoid them, but damn it if I ask for something I NEED not want it.
        on the flip side, not all Dr are quacks and their hands have been tied due the bad apple. Now itís too late we are pushing water uphill to get our help.
        They (government)are now trying find the middle ground and we are caught in the battle.
        im not bashing all docs, just the ones who didnít see past yesterday.
        As most of us MS sufferers we take one day at a time, each hour at a time, when the legs,feet,back,neck all hurt so bad we canít see straight. I hate not being able to just stand and walk across the floor. I hate the admitting Iím not what I used to be.

        I pray someday there be a miracle to end this cycle, but until then, I get up each day a push through because I have it in me (today) to not let this beat me. Iíve always been a fighter and survivor. Now Iíve learned to fight to live the day the best I can. I have learned the difference in surviving and living life, I will live life and keep my attitude that today is a good day, Iím here with ones I love, Iím still mobile just a little slower but maybe itís time we do slow down and enjoy the good. Iím always ďfineĒ when asked, yeah no. But why bring others down? Itís not going away so why dwell. There may come another day when I blame,hate and cuss......but not today!!!
        You have said a lot of important things. Thatís great you succeeded at getting your 75 year old client to be free of drugs. This goes to show there is no age where you are safe from drug addiction. From what you describe her pain was from muscular skeletal problems. Since I overcame the pain of 3 cervical disc herniations in my life, with PT, massage, exercise and lots of prayer I know it can be done without pain medication. (Maybe a little aspirin)There were so many times I wanted to die because it felt like the pain would never go away. It took five years. So I donít believe narcotics should be prescribed for muscular skeletal problems. Expect maybe 30 codeine tablets in 6 months(to be used only for when the pain becomes intolerable).

        Not all doctors are quacks and now the goo ones hand are tied...to be continued

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          #19
          Originally posted by DonnaH View Post
          I am the type who hates taking pills. BUT when I canít stand it I do.
          I'm a caregiver and my latest client was addicted to pain pills. Thereís no doubt she had pain, but once I got her up moving and stretching she started to feel better. It took me a year to ween her off, she, at 75 she was a drug addict. Only because she had a quack who found it easier to write a script instead of helping her.

          That is why we now have to suffer, the endless aches and pains that never subside. Not to mention the endless ER Drs who wrote norco, codeine and even morphine (for me personally) for anything I explained to them. I did NOT want them but because of last 25+ years of the easy way out they(dr) bred more and more addicts and and it was an easy way for addicts to get their ďfixĒ. Go to the ER and say my back hurts, say I have a headache and out comes the script pad.

          Now that the time has come of reality admitting our MS pain is real we must suffer the mistakes of yesterdayís.
          I still hate pills and do everything I can to avoid them. We invested in a spa, I pay for deep massages, I have just flat suffered and tried what I can to avoid them, but damn it if I ask for something I NEED not want it.
          on the flip side, not all Dr are quacks and their hands have been tied due the bad apple. Now itís too late we are pushing water uphill to get our help.
          They (government)are now trying find the middle ground and we are caught in the battle.
          im not bashing all docs, just the ones who didnít see past yesterday.
          As most of us MS sufferers we take one day at a time, each hour at a time, when the legs,feet,back,neck all hurt so bad we canít see straight. I hate not being able to just stand and walk across the floor. I hate the admitting Iím not what I used to be.

          I pray someday there be a miracle to end this cycle, but until then, I get up each day a push through because I have it in me (today) to not let this beat me. Iíve always been a fighter and survivor. Now Iíve learned to fight to live the day the best I can. I have learned the difference in surviving and living life, I will live life and keep my attitude that today is a good day, Iím here with ones I love, Iím still mobile just a little slower but maybe itís time we do slow down and enjoy the good. Iím always ďfineĒ when asked, yeah no. But why bring others down? Itís not going away so why dwell. There may come another day when I blame,hate and cuss......but not today!!!
          I am starting to see some light at the end of the tunnel. Yes, it has been the standard of care from neurologists to not use opioids for the neuropathic pain that MS causes. Reasoning: neuropathic pain does not respond to opiates.

          But, when I first went to a pain management doctor, he said, ďwhat you have is neuropathic pain. This is the same kind of pain as cancer pain.Ē Yet society pampers cancer patients and leave people with MS out in the cold.

          But the latest developments are interesting. The FDA finally came out with a warning that the war against opioids has had some unintended consequences and warns against overzealous laws to prevent prescriptions.

          To follow suit, the CDC has issued a new statement (June 2019) outlining in great detail the benefits of treating long term chronic pain with opiate derived drugs and clarifying their previous misunderstood guidelines. Awareness is shining through. I think MS patients have hope.

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