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Please describe your M.S. related fatigue

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    #61
    Originally posted by CVenatici View Post
    If its 1 or 3 miles or even a long walk, it nevertheless eats away the reserves I would otherwise use for chores, children, etc.I can safely say that it doesn’t help my energy levels to exercise because i have tested it. That’s not to say it doesn’t make me feel good in other ways, but i have to tread lightly if i wish to get through the day.
    Hello CVenatici!

    Depending on the type of chores, you may be getting exercise without realizing it.

    I posted this in February (General Questions and Answers Forum) - don't know if you have had a chance to read it, so I'll repost here.


    Do it your way.

    Exercise doesn’t have to mean going to the gym or going out for a run; it could be something as simple as housework or a walk.

    Make it part of your daily routine.

    You're more likely to stick with it if it’s easy. If you are in a wheelchair, while you are watching the TV you could use advert breaks to do some exercise: why not try some arm jogging while you are watching the meerkats? Or some balance work when you are putting the kettle on?

    Short can be sweet!

    Just a minute of arm jogging with a bit of gusto will improve your heart rate and get you breathing deeper. There is growing evidence to show that doing short bursts of exercise, rather than one great long burst, will improve fitness. For people with MS, when fatigue and heat can be a factor, exercising like this can really help.

    Pace yourself.

    Don’t overdo it, especially if starting to exercise after a break. Listen to your body when it tells you to stop. You will get to learn how much you can manage in one go without leaving yourself exhausted. And remember that other important activities like work, cooking or parenting, take up energy too. Leave yourself enough in the tank to get through the day.

    Stay cool.

    Everyone can feel lethargic in hot or humid weather, but with MS the effect is often exaggerated. Try using a fan or a cold water spray when exercising or have a cool bath before you start.

    Remember to breathe!

    It might sound obvious, but you’d be surprised by the number of people who hold their breath when they exercise.

    Set up a nudge.

    Have a trigger to remind you to exercise. Maybe when the adverts or weather come on the television, or while waiting for the kettle to boil. Set an alarm on your phone?

    Top tips for staying active when you have MS | MS Trust

    Build your own exercise routine | MS Trust
    PPMS for 23 years (dx 1998)
    ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

    Comment


      #62
      You do need to listen to your body. If you are doing alot of chores and childcare, that can take your reserves. Have you tried gradual exercise to build up and tolerance?

      I know when I am allowed to start walking again, it will be a 5 minute walk 1/x a day, then 2/x a day, then 3/x a day, then will try 10min 1/x a day, and 5 min 2/x a day until I can build up to 45 minutes 1/x a day without it depleting me. It will take months to get there though. Even then, the pace I go may vary day to day and week to week, depending on what else is requiring my energy.

      Other thing - how is your sleep? Do you get a good restful night's sleep? It is really important.

      Finally, you mentioned an anti- depressant. Is your depression well controlled? Does the medicine itself cause fatigue? You may want to review with your doctor.

      Before attributing it all to MS fatigue, it is important to reduce/eliminate any
      contributing factors such as stress, depression, anxiety, sleep disorders. All of which can result directly from MS. It can all also result secondarily from dealing with a chronic condition like MS and the challenges it causes to our daily life, work, and relationships.

      I hope you are able to find some relief.

      ​​​​​​
      ​​​​​​​
      Kathy
      DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

      Comment


        #63
        CVenatici, you have been given great information. Some medications list drowsiness and sleepiness as side effects. This can cause even more fatigue. I believe it’s important to research side effects of any medications you may be taking.

        I have been diagnosed for a very long time. To this day I continue to encourage others to exercise. My exercise is mainly weight training, but I also use an Elliptical

        Find anything that keeps you moving but please be careful to not overdo.

        Take care






        Diagnosed 1984
        “Lightworkers aren’t here to avoid the darkness…they are here to transform the darkness through the illuminating power of love.” Muses from a mystic

        Comment


          #64
          To answer a couple of your questions -

          Do you believe it is different than when "normal" people get fatigued?
          Yes, I believe it is different. I know how I felt when I was tired before I had MS or before my MS was as bad as it is now. I could push through. I had a reserve of energy/adrenaline. Now it's as though if I try to push through the fatigue, the fatigue just takes over like a lead blanket. I just have to rest when I feel fatigued. Like I do at the moment. Sometimes I'm overtaken with anxiety when fatigued. I have had other people mention how "tired they are" and just keep going or yapping like a Cuisinart stuck on high - Me, I just sit down and get real quiet.

          What is the typical response from others when you speak about fatigue? That can vary. I get tired of trying to explain it. I've mentioned it's more like how you're tired when you are sick than just being tired. It would be easier if they would "walk in a mile in my numb shoes" - then I wouldn't have to explain anything and they would understand perfectly.

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