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WELCOME TO OUR NEW HOME!

Hello MSWorld Members,

Welcome to our new home! We hope you love it as much as we do!


we promise.

to offer current and relevant information.

to grow a community built on positive and affirming support.

to showcase member creativity.

to provide safe chat rooms.

to provide well moderated forums.


we believe that what we give as a community comes back to us.

welcome to MSWorld on this journey through a different lens. together. we are msworld.
we are. community.


We appreciate your understanding as we finalize our new home. Our arcade is still currently under construction and won’t be available for a while. Thank you for your patience while we prepare a new and improved arcade for you.

enjoy our new home.

support reimagined.
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Depression DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria

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    Depression DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria

    Depression, otherwise known as major depressive disorder or clinical depression, is a common and serious mood disorder. Those who suffer from depression experience persistent feelings of sadness and hopelessness and lose interest in activities they once enjoyed. Aside from the emotional problems caused by depression, individuals can also present with a physical symptom such as chronic pain or digestive issues. To be diagnosed with depression, symptoms must be present for at least two weeks.

    Depression DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria


    The DSM-5 outlines the following criterion to make a diagnosis of depression. The individual must be experiencing five or more symptoms during the same 2-week period and at least one of the symptoms should be either (1) depressed mood or (2) loss of interest or pleasure.

    1. Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day.
    2. Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day.
    3. Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain, or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day.
    4. A slowing down of thought and a reduction of physical movement (observable by others, not merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down).
    5. Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day.
    6. Feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt nearly every day.
    7. Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day.
    8. Recurrent thoughts of death, recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide.

    To receive a diagnosis of depression, these symptoms must cause the individual clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The symptoms must also not be a result of substance abuse or another medical condition.
    1st sx '89 Dx '99 w/RRMS - SP since 2010
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