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Metformin Works to Promote Remyelination

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    Metformin Works to Promote Remyelination

    Metformin, a common diabetes treatment that works to mimic dietary fasting, was seen to promote remyelination in the stem cells of elderly rats, suggesting it may be useful in treating multiple sclerosis.

    Researchers in this study first showed that, as rats age, their OPCs lose the ability to readily mature into functional oligodendrocytes, a process common to aging. They found that, if given the proper stimuli, about 60% of OPCs from young rats grow into mature oligodendrocytes, while in aged rats less than 20% mature to oligodendrocyte cells.


    The researchers then compared OPCs from old (20–24 months) and young animals (2–3 months), and found that aged OPCs exhibit certain cellular changes that are associated with cellular aging, particularly changes to their mitochondria (the cell’s powerhouses where energy is produced).

    “As with most regenerative processes, the efficiency of remyelination declines progressively with aging to the extent that it becomes so slow that it eventually fails,” they wrote. “This has important implications for chronic demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) that can extend over several decades. Delayed remyelination renders demyelinated axons susceptible to [the] irreversible degeneration” evident in later MS stages.

    The team wondered if targeting these cellular changes could improve the ability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to turn into oligodendrocytes and, by extension, promote remyelination.

    Researchers used two approaches with the animals. The first was a alternate day fasting, where rats only ate every other day, which is known to limit cellular aging; the second was giving them metformin, a “small-molecule fasting mimetic” used to lower blood-sugar levels in diabetics, which acts through a protein called AMPK. This protein plays an important role in helping mitochondria work to produce cellular energy as intended.

    Results showed that both approaches could promote the formation of oligodendrocytes in elderly rats, leading to better myelin repair.

    In rats with chemically induced lesions of myelin loss, both alternate day fasting and metformin also improved remyelination relative to rats given neither treatment approach.

    “Overcoming the effects of aging on OPCs is important in generating a permissive environment for remyelination. Interventions such as dietary restriction or drugs that mimic its effects will likely alter the function of OPCs and other cell types that contribute to remyelination … and may thus have dual benefits for the treatment of chronic demyelinating neurodegenerative diseases,” the study concluded.

    Robin Franklin, PhD, a professor at the University of Cambridge and study co-author, called the finding “one of the most significant advances in myelin repair therapies there has ever been,” he said in a U.K. MS Society news release.

    “The findings shed light on why cells lose their ability to regenerate myelin, and how this process might be reversed. Although research so far has been done in rats, we hope to move it forward into humans soon,” Franklin added.


    Source: https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.c...epair-in-rats/

    #2
    I'm going to ask my Neurologist for some.
    The future depends on what you do today.- Gandhi

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Boudreaux View Post
      I'm going to ask my Neurologist for some.
      Boudreaux ~

      Good luck!

      Might be difficult to get, if you're wanting it for MS - unless you're an elderly rat.

      Take Care
      PPMS for 22 years (dx 1998)
      ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by KoKo View Post
        Boudreaux ~

        Good luck!

        Might be difficult to get, if you're wanting it for MS - unless you're an elderly rat.

        Take Care
        The private Neurologist that I see who is not an MS Specialist shot me down. Since I am service connected for my MS, I also receive care through the VA. The VA schedules us (MS patients) with the MS specialist at LSU and I have my follow up with him in December. I'll see what he has to say about the Metformin. I'm not overly optimistic about someone prescribing it but if I don't ask, the answer is already no.

        On a positive note, I got an MRI done 2 weeks ago and the radiologist report reads little to no change since last MRI. That makes 4 years with no new activity.
        The future depends on what you do today.- Gandhi

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Boudreaux View Post
          I'm not overly optimistic about someone prescribing it but if I don't ask, the answer is already no.
          Good point, Boudreaux.

          Originally posted by Boudreaux View Post
          On a positive note, I got an MRI done 2 weeks ago and the radiologist report reads little to no change since last MRI. That makes 4 years with no new activity.
          Fantastic!

          Take Care
          PPMS for 22 years (dx 1998)
          ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

          Comment


            #6
            No remyelination here and I've been on Metformin for over 20 years, had ms for 31 years.
            Linda

            Comment


              #7
              My neurologist from the VA prescribed me some.
              The future depends on what you do today.- Gandhi

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Boudreaux View Post
                My neurologist from the VA prescribed me some.
                That's good to know, Boudreaux! Hope you get some benefits!

                Take Care
                PPMS for 22 years (dx 1998)
                ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Boudreaux View Post
                  My neurologist from the VA prescribed me some.
                  Has the Metformin made a difference in your MS. If so, what changed?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Sorry to bring bad news for those who are interested in using Metformin.
                    This article from June 1, 2020 will put the kabosh on its useage-
                    https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/news/...erous-chemical


                    June 1, 2020 -- A recall of the widely-used diabetes drug metformin was announced by drug maker Apotex, due to possible high levels of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is believed to cause cancer in people.

                    The recall for all lots of metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets 500 mg from Apotex comes after one lot tested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had higher NDMA levels than allowed by the FDA.

                    NDMA is an environmental contaminant that's found in water and foods, including meats, dairy products, and vegetables.

                    Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets are prescribed to be used along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults and children age 10 and older with type 2 diabetes.

                    NDMA contamination triggered numerous recalls of widely-used heart medicines last year.

                    And from June 16, 2020 -
                    https://www.beckershospitalreview.co...a-warning.html

                    Since the FDA said in late May that it found unacceptable levels of a caricinogen in metformin — the generic name for a drug commonly used to control blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes patients — five drugmakers have issued recalls of their metformin products.

                    The carcinogen, N-nitrosodimethylamine, or NDMA, was originally found by online pharmacy Valisure in early March.

                    The five drugmakers that have recalled their metformin products:

                    Lupin Pharmaceuticals recalled one lot of its metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets.

                    Teva Pharmaceuticals recalled 14 lots of its metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets, including the 500 mg and 750 mg bottles.

                    Marksans Pharma Limited recalled one lot of its extended-release metformin tablet.

                    Amneal Pharmaceuticals recalled all lots of its metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets.

                    Apotex recalled all lots of its metformin extended-release tablets.
                    1st sx '89 Dx '99 w/RRMS - SP since 2010
                    Administrator Message Boards/Moderator

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