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New mom experiencing postpartum relapse

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    New mom experiencing postpartum relapse

    I am the new mother of a beautiful baby boy who is 8 weeks old today. 10 days after he was born I began feeling some weakness in my legs and started having difficulty walking. I took an oral dose of steroids but it was ineffective. My symptoms have worsened and now I am unable to be alone with baby because I can not safely carry him as I am unable to walk. It is a nightmare. This is by far the worst relapse I have ever had, and I am scared that I won't recover. Prior to pregnancy my symptoms were very stable on Gilenya (no symptoms or relapses since I started it in 2011). I started back on Gilenya 4/8. Are there any other women out there who have had post partum relapses this severe and recovered? I am desperate for some hope...

    #2
    Hi smilehr,

    Congratulations on the birth of your child

    Recovery of severe exacerbations are very possible. Has your Neurologist offered any advice/help? Did your Neurologist offer higher dose IV steroids to see that that might help?

    I never had a exacerbation post-partum (I have 2 children). I have had severe exacerbations affecting mobility. One of those was when my children were 2 & 4 years old. It was difficult but not impossible. At the time letting my children "race" me gave them smiles and laughs as they were faster than Mom.

    When my mobility is affected I need to take several "walks" a day. In the early stage this means I take short trips walking around in my home. Little by little extending those walks. Over time the walks start to extend to the outside, a quarter way up the driveway and back and so it goes. I found I had to "walk" to be able to walk again. Trying to regain my mobility was so full of frustration, tears, anger and exhaustion.

    I hope you have family support at this difficult time Please keep trying to regain your mobility and know it can get better

    My Neurologist told me the best thing I could do is...Walk.
    Diagnosed 1984
    “Lightworkers aren’t here to avoid the darkness…they are here to transform the darkness through the illuminating power of love.” Muses from a mystic

    Comment


      #3
      my postpartum story

      I'm sorry to hear about your postpartum relapse. Having a newborn is challenging and emotional, and dealing with MS at the same time is something people who don't have MS just can't understand. I was EXACTLY where you are 8 years ago. My daughter tuns 8 next month. My MS was very stable before pregnancy. It started getting very active 2 months postpartum. It was a year not knowing where one relapse ended and another began. Steroids were somewhat effective in relieving some symptoms, but I never recovered fully.
      I was not on any DMDs prior to pregnancy, but I started copaxone 7 months postpartum. I continued to get worse in the 8 months following while taking copaxone. For me, it didn't work. I started tysabri soon after and finally saw my symptoms get under control.

      It's so different for everyone, but that's my story. Keep us updated on how you're doing! Take good care and enjoy your new baby!
      Stacey

      Comment


        #4
        Carolinemf

        Originally posted by smilehr View Post
        I am the new mother of a beautiful baby boy who is 8 weeks old today. 10 days after he was born I began feeling some weakness in my legs and started having difficulty walking. I took an oral dose of steroids but it was ineffective. My symptoms have worsened and now I am unable to be alone with baby because I can not safely carry him as I am unable to walk. It is a nightmare. This is by far the worst relapse I have ever had, and I am scared that I won't recover. Prior to pregnancy my symptoms were very stable on Gilenya (no symptoms or relapses since I started it in 2011). I started back on Gilenya 4/8. Are there any other women out there who have had post partum relapses this severe and recovered? I am desperate for some hope...
        I didn't know that i had ms until i had my first child. 3 months after my son was born i literally woke up completely paralysed and spent the next 3 weeks flat on my back being fed and having sponge baths and getting stuck with pins in hospital. I had about 3 more bad attaches over the next few years and ongoing minor symptoms and issues. Unfortunately although I believed I had MS (due to family history) doctors didn't diagnose me for ten years.

        Although of course everyone is different i hope you find some comfort in knowing that even though this initial attach of mine was quite severe and took a lot to overcome (not helped by doctors at the time)i went on to have an additional 4 children and live an active life despite my ms. I have never fully regained the muscle tone or energy that i had previously but i have managed to live a active and busy life since that first major incapacity 29 years ago.

        I hope my experience lessens your anxiety and your symptoms settle down and you are able to enjoy having your child. Please try and take one day at a time and don't worry to much as i found this was this hardiest thing to deal with.

        ** Moderator's note - Post broken into paragraphs for easier reading. Many people with MS have visual difficulties that prevent them from reading large blocks of print. **

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