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    Snoring

    Snoring is something new to me. It only just started about 6 months ago and is intermittent. Of course, I have no idea unless hubby tells me about it. I've noticed it happens when the weakness and fatigue shows up. For example, just a few days ago the arm and leg weakness returned. I'm also fatigued these last few days. I'm up at 5:30 am (by choice - I'm an online ESL teacher), have a nap for an hour and a half in the afternoon, and am back in bed by 9 or 9:30 pm. When I'm in bed I sleep very soundly as I'm so tired. My FitBit sleep scores, if you understand what I'm referring to, are always in the high 80s. When I'm asleep, I'm asleep! I do wake usually once to pee. But other than that I'm out.

    Is it possible the snoring is an MS thing? Of course I've Googled.....so many things can cause snoring but because it's so intermittent and seems to coincide with my other symptoms I do wonder if it's related. Does anyone else suffer from this? Advice? Thoughts?

    I feel terrible I'm keeping hubby awake. As with all of this he's been a trooper. But it's not fair to be disruptive to his sleep, either.

    Gosh, my life has become, "Is this an MS thing or....." .
    "Ring the bells that still can ring. Forget your perfect offering. There is a crack a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in.
    ~Leonard Cohen


    DX November, 2020. Ontario, Canada

    #2
    I haven't heard anything about snoring and MS.

    I know my husband (no MS or other health conditions) snores extra loud when he is really tired. I want him to get a sleep study since chronic snorer, but exhaustion does raise the decibel level. Our one saving grace, since he grinds his teeth, the dentist gave him a mouth guard. And guess what, it stops him snoring!

    It couldn't hurt to mention it to your neuro. I am not sure if they would do a sleep study if not a chronic occurrence.

    Kathy
    DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

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      #3
      What comes to mind based on your post is the possibility of a sleep disorder. This is easily ruled in/out with a sleep study.
      Diagnosed 1984
      “Lightworkers aren’t here to avoid the darkness…they are here to transform the darkness through the illuminating power of love.” Muses from a mystic

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        #4
        Snoring runs in my family, so as distressing as this must be for you, I wish I could say I'd just started! My boy and I both have CPAP's now, and my mother and her sister were advised to get them but refused. Their father snored so loudly that you could hear him outside, and I wish the sleep masks had been invented back when he could have used one. There were many nights that my grandmother would poke him to get him to start breathing again.

        I don't think snoring is specifically an MS thing, but it's definitely worse the more tired you are.

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          #5
          I have a sleep study tomorrow and convinced I have sleep APNEA but more so RLS, or restless leg syndrome. Needless to say I am freaking out and am looking for help or advice. Is the RLS considered a exacerbation? I've never had it during the day like this and i'm beyond freaking out. Any advice or help would be appreciated and I was on modafanil for a week for fatigue but thought I was going to pass out. I'm a hot mess right now and looking for any advice for both fatigue and RLS. THANKS IN ADVANCE,
          MIKE
          Mike

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            #6
            Originally posted by mike423 View Post
            I have a sleep study tomorrow and convinced I have sleep APNEA but more so RLS, or restless leg syndrome. Needless to say I am freaking out and am looking for help or advice. Is the RLS considered a exacerbation? I've never had it during the day like this and i'm beyond freaking out. Any advice or help would be appreciated and I was on modafanil for a week for fatigue but thought I was going to pass out. I'm a hot mess right now and looking for any advice for both fatigue and RLS. THANKS IN ADVANCE,
            MIKE
            Hi Mike.

            I don't believe RLS would be considered an exacerbation. There are multiple potential causes including genetics and like MS, is not fully understood.

            I had a sleep study years ago, which concluded I slept well, but did confirm I have RLS. It made sense to me, since when I was young, I could wind up at the bottom of the bed and when at my grandparents shore house, noone ever wanted to sleep with me since I kicked so much (even kicked a few cousins out of bed).

            As an adult, it mostly occurs in the evening, usually once I lay down. I have declined any of the medicines that may be used, as for me, it doesn't affect me terribly or affect quality of life much. When it does flare during the day, stretching and working on relaxing the mind usually work.

            As for fatigue, we have a separate forum for it. You may find some useful information on managing fatigue. If you do have sleep apnea and/or RLS, they would be contributing factors.
            https://www.msworld.org/forum/forum/...tments/fatigue

            Lots of luck to you.
            Kathy
            DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

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              #7
              Thanks pennstater, can't tell you how much it means. My neuro hasn't replied and I'm just having a really hard time. I'm really not interested in more drugs and I'm looking for a natural solution for fatigue and sleep issues. Hoping sleep study tomorrow gives me results of something, but I know that there's a lot of natural ways to treat it. Haven't had a drop of alcohol since before Thanksgiving, cut down smoking alot, and gonna start exercising more. But thanks again, and from one of my heroes, jimmy v, don't give up
              Mike

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                #8
                I think there are many possible causes for snoring.

                I was a horrible snorer many years back when I had a sinus infection. It improved greatly after a sinus surgery. Now, my husband tells me I snore occasionally.

                My husband snores regularly. I can't sleep when he does, but he seems to only snore when he is sleeping very lightly. I'm able to whisper to him, "You're snoring. Please turn over on your side", and he hears me and willingly turns over. He doesn't seem to snore when he is on his left side.

                He also snores loudly when he falls asleep in the recliner but I let him snore to his heart's content there. I've thought about taking a video so he'd be able to observe how loud he is, but I haven't.

                Another strategy that helps to decrease his snoring is a daily calcium / magnesium supplement.
                ~ Faith
                MSWorld Volunteer -- Moderator since JUN2012
                (now a Mimibug)

                Symptoms began in JAN02
                - Dx with RRMS in OCT03, following 21 months of limbo, ruling out lots of other dx, and some "probable stroke" and "probable CNS" dx for awhile.
                - In 2008, I was back in limbo briefly, then re-dx w/ MS: JUL08
                .

                - Betaseron NOV03-AUG08; Copaxone20 SEPT08-APR15; Copaxone40 APR15-present
                - Began receiving SSDI / LTD NOV08. Not employed. I volunteer in my church and community.

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                  #9
                  I have snored all my life. Snoring was nothing new to me when I was diagnosed with MS. I eventually did a sleep study and it said I had obstructive sleep apnea. After I was fired from my job of over ten years I was also diagnosed with narcolepsy which was the reason I was fired.

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