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The Brain Reserve Hypothesis in MS

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    #16
    Originally posted by Myoak View Post
    Hello,

    IMO, not utilizing memory if doing so is possible, does not preserve brain function, but rather depletes it.

    Memory, like muscle, is developed by use; at least that has been true in my experience.

    But on a more formal note we do know from scientific studies that intellectually enriching activities build “brain reserve” and slow cognitive impairment.

    Cognitive Leisure Activities
    Read books
    Read magazines or newspapers
    Produce art (e.g., painting, poetry, sculpture)
    Produce non-artistic writing (e.g., newsletter, diary, essays)
    Play a musical instrument
    Play structured games (e.g., board games, cards, crossword puzzles)
    Participate in hobbies (e.g., model building, gardening, web design)

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4524787/

    Searching for the neural basis of reserve against memory decline: intellectual enrichment linked to larger hippocampal volume in multiple sclerosis.

    “Active engagement in intellectually enriching activities (e.g., reading, hobbies) builds “reserve” against memory decline in elders and persons with multiple sclerosis (MS)”

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2822636/

    Intellectual enrichment is linked to cerebral efficiency in multiple sclerosis: functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for cognitive reserve

    Conclusion

    The current research utilized fMRI to demonstrate that intellectual enrichment is associated with cerebral efficiency in neurological patients, thereby supporting the cognitive reserve hypothesis…

    the brain's; default network has become an important construct in neuroscience and neurology, especially because activity within the default network is reduced among patient with neurological disease.

    Our results show that default network activity is strongly related to intellectual enrichment/cognitive reserve, at least in patients with multiple sclerosis…

    Perhaps most importantly, multiple sclerosis patients with greater expression of the identified network appear able to withstand multiple sclerosis disease better before showing cognitive impairment."

    https://multiple-sclerosis-research....brain-reserve/

    CLINICSPEAK: CREATING BRAIN RESERVE
    Thanks for your input! I've been waiting! LOL!

    I am just wondering how "brain reserve" or "cognitive reserve" could even be effectively studied when technically, it is not even for sure an real thing? All these brain enriching meds on the market leave me skeptical at best. I also often hear about the brain being a muscle, but of course, it's not a muscle.

    I don't have answers. Just questions.

    Thanks!
    Tawanda
    ___________________________________________
    Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis 2004; First sign of trouble: 1994

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      #17
      The functional MRI let's then see what area of the brain are active during different tasks. The 3D MRIs let them see grey matter volume.

      Neither of these tests are commonly available, but they are used as part of the toolset in studies of the brain.
      Kathy
      DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

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        #18
        Originally posted by Tawanda View Post
        Thanks for your input! I've been waiting! LOL!

        I am just wondering how "brain reserve" or "cognitive reserve" could even be effectively studied when technically, it is not even for sure an real thing? All these brain enriching meds on the market leave me skeptical at best. I also often hear about the brain being a muscle, but of course, it's not a muscle.

        I don't have answers. Just questions.

        Thanks!
        You are welcome! Oh yes, brain reserve, or cognitive reserve is a real thing because that is what the studies were about... measuring and comparing. When you can measure something, it is some thing, it is real. The details regarding those measurements are in those free-access full study links.

        You are right in being skeptical of brain enriching "meds" or supplements. However, I must say that metformin certainly appears beneficial for PwMS. I have followed the limited research about it for years...

        https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jam...rticle/2499459

        Ha! I got a pleasant laugh out of your brain is not a muscle comment. Of course, it is not. The idea is one of exercising intellect like exercising muscle... both are developed and preserved through using them by conscious, designed effort.

        Also, I am a huge fan of alpha lipoic acid, an OTC supplement which has demonstrated good effect preserving brain volume.

        Green tea, or green tea extract has benefits, also, IMO.

        Best Wishes

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Myoak View Post

          Ha! I got a pleasant laugh out of your brain is not a muscle comment. Of course, it is not. The idea is one of exercising intellect like exercising muscle... both are developed and preserved through using them by conscious, designed effort.

          Also, I am a huge fan of alpha lipoic acid, an OTC supplement which has demonstrated good effect preserving brain volume.

          Green tea, or green tea extract has benefits, also, IMO.

          Best Wishes
          I will research these supplements. Thank you.

          What worries me about this hypothesis in terms of MS is that you only have so much brain mass...as your circuitry gets messed up, and the neurological connections are not as "direct" as they once were. I picture new, less efficient paths developing (backroads as opposed to highways). I just don't know how much brain I have left to accommodate these new crappier roads being built all the time!

          Not promoting anything here of course but wondering if anyone else has read "The Brain that Changes Itself". I do recall someone here discussing it...
          Tawanda
          ___________________________________________
          Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis 2004; First sign of trouble: 1994

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Tawanda View Post
            I will research these supplements. Thank you.

            What worries me about this hypothesis in terms of MS is that you only have so much brain mass...as your circuitry gets messed up, and the neurological connections are not as "direct" as they once were. I picture new, less efficient paths developing (backroads as opposed to highways). I just don't know how much brain I have left to accommodate these new crappier roads being built all the time!

            Not promoting anything here of course but wondering if anyone else has read "The Brain that Changes Itself". I do recall someone here discussing it...
            Tawanda ~

            I found a summary of "The Brain that Changes Itself", about neuroplasticity.

            It does talk about taking up brain space.

            "This also explains why it’s so hard to learn a new language past a certain age, says Norman Doidge.

            It’s not just because the critical period for language learning has ended, but also because the more we use our native tongue, the more it comes to dominate our linguistic map space, thus leaving little space for a new entry.

            Similarly, it’s very important for our habits.

            Learning a new habit is not just about learning a new one, but also getting rid of the old ones, because that old bad habit has now taken over a brain map and leaves little space for the new one."

            Interesting!

            Take Care
            PPMS for 24 years (dx 1998)
            ~ Worrying will not take away tomorrow's troubles ~ But it will take away today's peace. ~

            Comment


              #21
              I read the book you are discussing, The Brain That Changes Itself. I found it really fascinating.
              Kathy
              DX 01/06, currently on Tysabri

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