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General Questions and Answers For learning, sharing your experience, and exchanging information about Multiple Sclerosis. Please discuss medications in the Medications forum, and natural supplements in Tara's forum.

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  #1  
Old 03-22-2012, 01:06 AM
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meeegun meeegun is offline
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eyes shaking when waking up?

I have been noticing an increase in this. basically when i am first waking up and opening my eyes, i have difficulty seeing because it feels like my eyes are shaking back and forth. this doesn't happen any other time, just upon awakening and its worse if i am very tired. does this happen to anyone else?
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:04 AM
Bob698 Bob698 is offline
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Its more like the opposite for me.
I used to be able to make my eyes move like that whenever I wanted, it was kinda like a parlor trick I'd use to freak out my buds.
I can't do it anymore, no idea if its just because I'm older or if its due to MS.
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  #3  
Old 03-23-2012, 05:32 AM
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I have this problem but only in the evening when I'm tired. I also notice it in the evening when I'm trying to read. My eyes shake back and forth uncontrollably. It usually doesn't happen once I get rest.
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  #4  
Old 03-23-2012, 05:45 AM
nabean nabean is offline
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I also have this happen but I don't know that it is happening when it does. Usually my husband tells me. apparently when I am looking at things my eyes go back and forth in short fast motions. But I am still looking at the one item. I do notice that It happens most when Iam tired. Don't know if it is a MS thing or a being tired thing! haha!
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  #5  
Old 03-23-2012, 06:33 AM
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KyleW KyleW is offline
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I have earl morning vision issues as well. In my case it's double vision for the the first couple of minutes I'm awake. It can also pop up if I am overly tired. In my case it's caused by nystagmus. The nerves that control the eye muscles don't send clear instructions.

This is from the National Institutes of Health

Nystagmus
Nystagmus is a term to describe fast, uncontrollable movements of the eyes that may be:

Side to side (horizontal nystagmus)
Up and down (vertical nystagmus)
Rotary (rotary or torsional nystagmus)
Depending on the cause, these movements may be in both eyes or in just one eye. The term "dancing eyes" has been used to describe nystagmus.

Considerations
The involuntary eye movements of nystagmus are caused by abnormal function in the areas of the brain that control eye movements. The part of the inner ear that senses movement and position (the labyrinth) helps control eye movements.

There are two forms of nystagmus:

Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is present at birth.
Acquired nystagmus develops later in life because of a disease or injury.
Causes
NYSTAGMUS THAT IS PRESENT AT BIRTH (infantile nystagmus syndrome, or INS)

INS is usually mild. It does not become more severe, and it is not related to any other disorder.

People with this condition are usually not aware of the eye movements, but other people may see them. If the movements are large, sharpness of vision (visual acuity) may be less than 20/20. Surgery may improve vision.

Nystagmus may be caused by congenital diseases of the eye. Although this is rare, an ophthalmologist should evaluate any child with nystagmus to check for eye disease.

ACQUIRED NYSTAGMUS

The most common cause of acquired nystagmus is certain drugs or medication. Phenytoin (Dilantin) - an antiseizure medication, excessive alcohol, or any sedating medicine can impair the labyrinth's function.

Other causes include:

Head injury from motor vehicle accidents
Inner ear disorders such as labyrinthitis or Meniere's disease
Stroke
Thiamine or vitamin B12 deficiency
Any disease of the brain (such as multiple sclerosis or brain tumors) can cause nystagmus if the areas controlling eye movements are damaged.
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:15 AM
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meeegun meeegun is offline
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yes i was wondering about nystagmus but i guess my real question is: can nystagmus be only at certain times per day or situations like what i am experiencing? it seems like if the brain is damaged and nystagmus results then wouldn't i be experiencing nystagmus consistently and not just in a situation such as waking up? if the damage to the brain is always there, wouldn't the signs of the damage also be apparent at all times as well?
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:01 AM
Redwings Redwings is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meeegun View Post
can nystagmus be only at certain times per day or situations like what i am experiencing?
Yes.

Quote:
it seems like if the brain is damaged and nystagmus results then wouldn't i be experiencing nystagmus consistently and not just in a situation such as waking up? if the damage to the brain is always there, wouldn't the signs of the damage also be apparent at all times as well?
Not necessarily. It depends on the sensory input to the affected areas of the brain, and that can be situational, such as awakening while reclined, or while riding in a car but not while standing still, or only when tired, when the compensatory mechanism is fatigued.

If you have a video camera or video in your phone, it could be helpful to get a close-up video capture of what your eyes are doing while you're feeling the sensation that they're shaking. A video can give your neurologist a chance to see what's happening, because it may never happen on its own, and might not be able to be induced, while you're in the doctor's office.
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  #8  
Old 03-25-2012, 12:41 PM
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meeegun meeegun is offline
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ok thanks. i have tried recording it in the past but its so fleeting. by the time i get the phone camcorder set up the shaking has stopped. although lately its been more consistent and seems to be lasting longer.
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